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23 Things Not To Say To Your Dance Partner

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You and your partner in this activity together, and you should treat them the same way you want to be treated. Respect is essential in a partnership. This means that some things are better left unsaid 🙊.

Disclaimer: This article is made you put a smile of your face. But, leaving all laughs behind, I encourage you to discuss anything that bothers you with your partner, as long as you pay attention to how you say it. Communication is necessary if you want a healthy partnership.

Now, here are a few things that you might want to not say to your partner:

1. My last partner was leading me much more smoothly.

2. You look like my last boyfriend/girlfriend.

3. Sorry I’m late this morning; I had a wild night out.

4. Don’t worry; I don’t think we’re going through the next round.

5. Your fake tan smells kinda funky. 

6. Oh, the comp is tomorrow?

7. You remind me of my mom.

8. I am better than you.

9. I am still am dancing with my ex-partner too.

10. I don’t really like dancing; I am here for the boys/girls.

11. Ugh, I hate learning technique!

12. I saw your dress in a video from the 80s.

13. Why is it taking you so long to learn that? It should be so easy!

14. My dad doesn’t like you.

15. Maybe you should quit dancing. It’s not for you.

16. See that couple? Make sure you hit them in Quickstep.

17. I don’t trust your thinking.

18. Ugh, your boyfriend/girlfriend annoys me.

19. I don’t care what we do in the next comp.

20. You studied with that teacher?! He/She is the worst!

21. I can’t stand you today.

22. I’ve worn these pants four days in a row.

23. I really want this step in our routine, but I am sure you can’t do it

Make sure you also visit Dancesportlife Academy to check our library of courses and camp lectures with some of the best teachers in the world!

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Faster, Stronger, Bigger…Better?

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Evolution is a process you can’t stop. Sometimes it is a faster process, and other times can be slower. You can predict where it can go, or it could take you by surprise.

Every aspect of our life is influenced by the contest we are living in. The cultural changes affected the trends in every form of art. 

The same goes for the art of bodily expression, such as dancesport.

In the ’80s, it was customary for men to go on the floor in a Latin-American competition wearing a lycra catsuit, maybe even pink or yellow. Or in ballroom, in the ’60s, ladies were “carrying” such a voluminous hairstyle that today would be not only funny but really impractical, considering the fast head actions we have in our routines.

Nevertheless, we’re not going to focus on fashion or style in this article but take a dive into the tendencies of making our dancing becoming stronger, faster, bigger. But is that better?

Faster

Speed is relative. We need to have a reference point to define whether something is fast or slow. When you are on an airplane, you don’t feel you are 800km/h because you are on the plane flying along with it. 

So what do we refer to when we talk about speed in dancing and what is the reference point that makes a dancer fast or not? What catches our eyes and makes the difference between a dancer to another one is the contrast. 

“There is no fast without slow” great teachers from England used to say. But what does this actually mean?

If you dance everything fast, it’s the same as if you would dance everything slow. A performance will stand out if you can show contrasts. Play with syncopations, use an articulated rhythm, and play more with your body’s different parts through isolation. 

Sometimes just a quick head rotation is enough to take a dull figure into something much more alive. You can create sharp leg actions or use a different rhythm than your partner’s. Another example is that you can emphasize slows and quicks by delaying and holding much more the slows to be faster. 

There are many possibilities to show a “faster” dance, but escape from the idea of making everything quicker just because they told you that you have to be fast.

Stronger

“Strong” and “powerful” are considered synonyms, but they can mean different things.

Strength is the ability of the body to overcome resistance. Power is the ability to exert as much force as possible in the shortest amount of time. To make it simple, Strength + Speed = Power.

Without any doubt, our modern dance style requires strength for many reasons: 

  • We need it to resist an increased centrifugal force in ballroom, due to a bigger upper volume of the couple and a higher rotational speed; 
  • We have to keep the hand connection when sending a strong input to the partner; 
  • The leg actions have to create a powerful yet controlled movement on the floor;
  • Our core should be active so that we can have a perfect posture.

But when we see a man’s shoulder line in standard suffering an immense tension, we don’t appreciate it. When in Latin-American dancing girls have such strong arms, we say that it’s not feminine. So what is the line between being not powerful enough and being too strong?  

To answer this question and understand what is best for our performance, we must get the audience’s perspective. A pleasant-to-watch couple must have a good body structure, powerful movement, and excellent body weight control.

Each one of these aspects requires a different kind of strength. The tone of the core muscles and ligaments will be responsible for your body posture. 

Then we need the muscles’ explosive power to make a good leg drive or stop a fast action, thus creating contrast. 

Thirdly, we must always control our body weight through continuous muscle work, which involves flexibility. That lets you have an exceptional ability to use eccentric, concentric, and isometric muscle work, creating that smooth body action that we all are searching for.

Bigger

“More is more.” 

We can agree with this statement in many circumstances, but is it the case for dancesport too?

If we see how they used to dance back in the ’60s, competitive dancing didn’t seek huge lines and big volumes. Today though, it seems impossible to compete with a small upper part or without a big drive action. 

But not all dances fit into the same box, each dance having its own character. One above all others is tango. Why should tango be big? Tango’s roots are not from a theater. On a stage. It wasn’t meant to impress people. Intimate, passionate, sad, angry, painful, elegant, but in a challenging way between man and woman, a search for each other against someone else’s will. 

So, can we maintain some of this character in our competitive performance? I don’t think we should say “can we” but “we must”. Top couples do that. That’s why we love to watch them. That’s why we can also appreciate their different styles. 

Of course, we can’t forget that to win a competition we have to show all the required aspects that judges are looking for, but we can’t completely go off track just seeking bigger movements.

Better

Nowadays the dancing level has drastically increased. A few decades ago, only top couples could perform well. Today, already from the younger categories, we can see great dancers from the ⅛. 

This is due to the mechanism that created good teachers that grew good students, generations to generations throughout the years. Today it’s not difficult to get information, to be able to practice, go to famous teachers. 

But the new generations have an essential duty on their shoulder: to improve dancing without losing the original character of each dance. 

Fashions change. We will see outstanding performances in the future for sure. But keep in mind that better doesn’t strictly mean more. Faster, stronger, and bigger than before should not be the guideline for the improvement. 

Unleash your talent without losing proportions, the character of the dance, musicality, and, most of all, your partner. 

The post Faster, Stronger, Bigger…Better? appeared first on Dancesport Life.

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What Do Ballroom & Latin Dancers and Drag Queens Have In Common?

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If you did not watch until now “RuPaul’s Drage Race”, close this article (just kiddin’, finish reading it first!) and go watch it. “RuPaul’s Drage Race” is an American reality competition television series where drag queens showcase their vast pallet of talents.

As a dancer, I am attracted to anything glittery or that has to do with entertainment. Therefore, I fell in love with drag queens’ artistry, and I couldn’t stop noticing some aspects that dancers have in common with them.  

“Lipstick, Powder and Paint”

Both dancers and drag queens have incredible skills with makeup. Everything is over the top, and the reason is that both types of makeup are based on stage makeup.

In stage makeup, you need to exaggerate your facial features because the stage lighting is super strong. 

Dancers even borrowed some of the tips and tricks drag queens use to make their facial features more feminine. They use a lot of highlighter to lift the cheekbones and contour to define, enhance, and sculpt the face’s structure. 

Another tip dancers borrowed from drag queens is “baking”. Applying a heavy amount of translucent powder will set your makeup and prevent you from sweating on that dance floor. 

Now, add some glitter and some XXL lashes “and 5, 6, 7, 8”!

What Do Ballroom & Latin Dancers and Drag Queens Have In Common?
Dancer makeup made by MUA Elena Likirichenko

What Do Ballroom & Latin Dancers and Drag Queens Have In Common?
Drag queen Alyssa Edwards

“Walk, Walk, Fashion Baby!”

Both dancers and drag queens are incredible at knowing how to carry themselves, especially in high heels.

And while we’re on the fashion subject, I am pretty sure that no other performers have so much glitter, lycra, lace, and Swarovski stones on their costumes. The flamboyant costumes are simply pieces of art. They have to attract all the attention! 

PS: That’s why when a dancer or a drag queen has a show, you always see them with the most oversized suitcases.

Another skill that drag queens and dancers have in common is knowing how to dress according to their figure or create the illusion of the shape they want to have. And they do that through the materials they use on their dresses, the stoning patterns, or where to add volume.

“Charisma, Uniqueness, Nerve, and Talent” 

Could you please point out a dancer or a drag queen who isn’t dramatic? Because I couldn’t find one.

This amount of drama also enables us to be super charismatic and cheeky. Drag queens are known for their sarcastic but tasteful comments, while good dancers will always know how to be playful on the dancefloor.

Both dancers and drag queens, being performers, know how to play different roles and how to truly embody those characters while dancing (or singing!).

Oh, and shhh…a little secret, as we already mentioned drama, we all can’t help ourselves to sharpen our ear to a little bit of gossip (a.k.a “spilling the tea”). 

We are all strong characters. Doing drag or dancing requires a lot of willpower, courage, ability to face critiques, professionalism, dedication, and PASSION.

To end this article, I leave you with one of my favorite quotes from RuPaul: 

“Drag doesn’t change who you are. It reveals who you are.”

It applies so beautifully to our artform as well because when you dance, you do not become somebody else. It’s just your personality that is blossoming!

The post What Do Ballroom & Latin Dancers and Drag Queens Have In Common? appeared first on Dancesport Life.

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Changing Country For Dancing: Insights From Kristina Moshenskaya

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Dancers, especially from the middle-high level and higher, travel very often. They have to go abroad to competitions, lessons, and training camps. But sometimes they decide to relocate because they found a partner in another city or another country.

In that case, we are not only talking about the possibility of seeing new places and different people but a real life-changing decision. 

This can be scary for many of us. Many dancers are even giving up dancing when faced with the decision of moving country for a new partner. 

We can all imagine how difficult and challenging it can be. But there are some excellent examples of champions that decided to change their lives to achieve their goals. 

One perfect example is one young lady from Ukraine who changed countries 3 times, became World Champion in WDSF Amateur Latin 5 times, and an idol for many dancers. This is Kristina Moshenskaya and she is willing to share some insights with us.

Matteo: Kristina, how many countries did you dance for?

Kristina: I danced for Ukraine, Russia, Italy, and now for Germany.

Matteo: And in how many countries did you live and practiced so far?

Kristina: Mostly, I was practicing in the countries I was living in.

Matteo: Which is the thing you miss the most by not practicing in your home country?

Kristina: I left Ukraine 13 years ago, so I cannot say that I miss something by not practicing in my home country. And the countries where I danced lately are very developed as well. But for sure, what I liked the most in the system I grew up was that there were many group lessons. This helped me develop with less money investment.

Matteo: Now you live in Germany, what do you like the most here?

Kristina: I think the infrastructure generally makes it easy. Like starting from everyday life and finishing with sports. For example, we have a dance club where we are practicing which has 4 halls. The rule is that one hall should always be available for free practice.

Matteo: I know it’s not nice to talk bad about places where you have been, but can you tell me a negative aspect for each country? 

Kristina: In Ukraine and Russia, because of the money currency, it’s complicated to take lessons with foreign teachers. Also, traveling to other countries is problematic because you need passport visas.

In Italy, it’s very difficult to practice during summertime as it’s very hot. Also, they don’t have a significantly developed public transport system, especially in small cities.

In Germany, there is a lot of paperwork and bureaucracy. And that is an issue if you have a full schedule like ours when you don’t have time to deal with it, you need to get a secretary or an accountant. 

Matteo: What has been more important? The place or the people?

Kristina: For sure the people are more important than the place. It also depends on you as a person, building up your setting and the schedule in the place you are living. 

Matteo: What should be a decisional factor for moving a country for dancing?

Kristina: It depends on different stuff: a better school, a better system, a better partner, or just a better lifestyle or a safer future.

Matteo: To conclude, please, what pieces of advice do you have for dancers who decide to change country for dancing? What should they be prepared for?

Kristina: To be flexible! If you move to another country, you need to accept this country’s culture, so you need to learn the language for starters.

It won’t be easy, especially in the beginning, but you need to be focused on your target 🎯.

The post Changing Country For Dancing: Insights From Kristina Moshenskaya appeared first on Dancesport Life.

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