Connect with us

NEWS

TOP 5 WDSF LATIN COUPLES: WATCH AND COMPARE!

Published

on

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada. Los campos obligatorios están marcados con *

NEWS

11 Best Online Courses On Ballroom & Latin Technique

Published

on

We’ve put together some of Dancesportlife Academy’s best courses and premium camp lectures for Ballroom & Latin technique. 

We also have massive Black Friday & Cyber Monday promotions at the moment, so if you decide to buy some of the courses, now is the time! 

1. Fundamentals Of Ballroom by Mirko & Edita Gozzoli

One of our best-selling courses is, by far, the greatest choice if you want to learn the core principles of Ballroom technique such as posture, hold, centres, footwork & body action. Furthermore, you get the chance to discover four novel choreographies and how to apply the theory to them.

Mirko & Edita Gozzoli barely need any introduction. They are one of the most renowned names in ballroom dancing. They have been both World Champions and European Champions.

Length: 4 hours 20 minutes

Link to the course

2. Fundamentals Of Quickstep by Hazel Newberry

Hazel Newberry MBE is one of the United Kingdom’s leading ballroom ladies and dance teachers. She was three times undefeated World Professional Ballroom champion. 

In her lecture at the Gladiators Dance Congress, she focused her attention on lead & follow by looking at body positioning and core principles such as contra body movement.

Length: 29 minutes

Link to the lecture

3. Paso Doble – Structure And Its 5 Elements by Alan Fletcher

When you say “Alan Fletcher” you automatically say “true legend of the Latin American dancing world”. One of the most sought after teachers, preparing couples to win the highest titles, reveals the five key aspects of Paso Doble.  

Learn from Alan some secrets on music, posture, shaping, framing, and resistance. Also, you will get a cameo from one of the most loved lady dancers. I’ll let you guess who that is!

Length: 26 minutes

Link to the lecture

4. Partnering Skills In Tango By Steve Powell

A true gentleman of the ballroom dancing world, Steve Powell is a multiple-time European Professional Ballroom finalist and a World Professional Ballroom Semi-finalist.

In his lecture from Gladiators Dance Congress, we can learn about partnering applied strictly in Tango, as it is quite different than the other Ballroom dances. Steve is looking mainly at how the body and foot positioning helps in mastering the partnering skills. 

Length: 31 minutes

Link to the lecture

5. Paso Shaping by Graham Oswick

Charming and charismatic, with a great competitive career behind him, Graham Oswick uses his knowledge to teach Ballroom and Latin American competitors valuable principles.

He showcases this charm and love for core principles of Latin-American dancing in his lecture from Gladiators Dance Congress. Graham explains how to create that distinct Paso shaping through mastering feet pressure and leg action.

Length: 29 minutes

Link to the lecture

6. Fundamentals Of Movement In Latin by Andrea Silvestri & Martina Varadi

Andrea Silvestri & Martina Varadi are one of the top WDSF Amateur Latin couples. They are finalists in all the major events such as Grand Slams and WDSF World & European Championships. 

For their Dancesportlife Academy course, they’ve put together five chapters of theory and choreography designed to help you learn the basic principles of bodyweight, movement, and connection. In the choreography part of the course, Andrea & Martina will show you four basic routines and four more advanced routines by applying all the principles discussed in the theoretical section.

Length: 2 hours 40 minutes

Link to the course

7. Use Of Different Timing In Cha-Cha-Cha By Goran Nordin

Goran is a former UK Closed Amateur Latin Champion, British National Professional Latin Champion, and a finalist in major competitions from the WDC world. 

He is known for his inclination towards choreography, timing, and musicality. And that is exactly what he discusses in his lecture from the Gladiators Dance Congress. Goran, with amazing enthusiasm, showcases how we can play with different timing in Cha-Cha-Cha.

Length: 28 minutes

Link to the lecture

8. Specific Positions That Give Character To Your Dance by Mirko Gozzoli

Mirko Gozzoli has a special place on this list as he appears not one time but three times! 

In this lecture from Gladiators Dance Congress, Mirko shows you how to dance a Tango that respects its character by creating different positions. 

Length: 32 minutes

Link to the lecture

9. Viennese Waltz And Its Technical Actions By Mirko Gozzoli

The third lecture held by Mirko is the one from Master Evolution Training Camp. 

As should expect from each of Mirko’s lecture, you will receive great details and discover hidden aspects of a dance. In this lecture, he teaches you the correct foot alignment & placement in Viennese Waltz and the amount of turn in the body position.

Length: 50 minutes

Link to the lecture

10. Bodyweight By Simona Fancello

Simona Fancello is a great ballroom instructor. Her career was filled with great results together with Fabio Selmi. She has been a finalist in all the major competitions, such as World & European Championships.

In this lecture, she focuses on the importance of bodyweight and how to use it in the fundamental basic steps of quickstep.

Length: 27 minutes

Link to the lecture

11. Slow Waltz And The 3 Important Actions: Swing, Sway, Shape By Irina Solomatina

Irina Solomatina is one of the most sought after teachers. Together with Alexander Melnikov, she was 12 times Russian Champions.

In her lecture from Master Evolution Training Camp, Irina explains thoroughly how the swing, sway, and shape in Slow Waltz are crucial for good leading in Slow Waltz

Length: 39 minutes

Link to the lecture

 

Next, we’ll make a list of courses and camp lectures that focus on softer skills such as musicality, artistry, or communication.

The post 11 Best Online Courses On Ballroom & Latin Technique appeared first on Dancesport Life.

Continue Reading

NEWS

You Probably Didn’t Know This About Oxana Lebedew & Pavel Zvychaynyy

Published

on

Pavel & Oxana are currently finalists in the WDC World Professional Latin and the WDC European Professional Latin Championships. They are the epitome of femininity and masculinity. 

In one of our discussions, Oxana & Pasha shared some secrets with us. 

1. Oxana’s zodiac sign is Aries and Pasha is a Scorpio, both really strong-minded and very determined.

2. Oxana has a ballet background.

3. Pasha had a friend who went to the same school as Oxana.

4. He knew from the first touch Oxana is the perfect partner for him.

5. Their main goal is to show real authentic Latin-American dancing.

6. Oxana went from Youth directly to Professional with her previous partner, Franco Formica.

7. Espen Salberg told Pasha that Oxana is free for a new partnership.

8. For Pasha, it is crucial to have authenticity & good connection and to understand the dance.

9. Oxana needs to have an excellent technical base, learn how to work with your body weight with your partner, and create unique moments.

10. Their first competition together was in Japan.

11. Oxana is afraid of heights.

12. Oxana’s mother is a choreographer & her father is a gymnast, her grandfather is a clarinet player, and her sister is also an artist.

13. There were moments when Oxana didn’t want to dance anymore.

14. Oxana’s parents were very supportive; her father still has the VCRs from when Oxana was a little girl.

15. Pasha left his family to live in Germany when he was 13 years old.

16. For Pasha, the most important is your development, not the competitions results. Always look for improvement. 

17. Pasha fell in love with Karina & Slavik’s style of dancing. That is why he now has the same teacher as they had: Espen Salberg. 

18. Pasha approached Espen to be his teacher at the World Championship in Innsbruck. 

19. Oxana considers that Pasha is the most hard-working person. 

20. Oxana has two courses on the Dancesportlife Academy platform: Mastering Of A Partnership and Finding Your Dancing Self.

Find out more about them and what they love the most about each other in our interview with them at Dance Amore Roma 2019.

The post You Probably Didn’t Know This About Oxana Lebedew & Pavel Zvychaynyy appeared first on Dancesport Life.

Continue Reading

NEWS

Faster, Stronger, Bigger…Better?

Published

on

Evolution is a process you can’t stop. Sometimes it is a faster process, and other times can be slower. You can predict where it can go, or it could take you by surprise.

Every aspect of our life is influenced by the contest we are living in. The cultural changes affected the trends in every form of art. 

The same goes for the art of bodily expression, such as dancesport.

In the ’80s, it was customary for men to go on the floor in a Latin-American competition wearing a lycra catsuit, maybe even pink or yellow. Or in ballroom, in the ’60s, ladies were “carrying” such a voluminous hairstyle that today would be not only funny but really impractical, considering the fast head actions we have in our routines.

Nevertheless, we’re not going to focus on fashion or style in this article but take a dive into the tendencies of making our dancing becoming stronger, faster, bigger. But is that better?

Faster

Speed is relative. We need to have a reference point to define whether something is fast or slow. When you are on an airplane, you don’t feel you are 800km/h because you are on the plane flying along with it. 

So what do we refer to when we talk about speed in dancing and what is the reference point that makes a dancer fast or not? What catches our eyes and makes the difference between a dancer to another one is the contrast. 

“There is no fast without slow” great teachers from England used to say. But what does this actually mean?

If you dance everything fast, it’s the same as if you would dance everything slow. A performance will stand out if you can show contrasts. Play with syncopations, use an articulated rhythm, and play more with your body’s different parts through isolation. 

Sometimes just a quick head rotation is enough to take a dull figure into something much more alive. You can create sharp leg actions or use a different rhythm than your partner’s. Another example is that you can emphasize slows and quicks by delaying and holding much more the slows to be faster. 

There are many possibilities to show a “faster” dance, but escape from the idea of making everything quicker just because they told you that you have to be fast.

Stronger

“Strong” and “powerful” are considered synonyms, but they can mean different things.

Strength is the ability of the body to overcome resistance. Power is the ability to exert as much force as possible in the shortest amount of time. To make it simple, Strength + Speed = Power.

Without any doubt, our modern dance style requires strength for many reasons: 

  • We need it to resist an increased centrifugal force in ballroom, due to a bigger upper volume of the couple and a higher rotational speed; 
  • We have to keep the hand connection when sending a strong input to the partner; 
  • The leg actions have to create a powerful yet controlled movement on the floor;
  • Our core should be active so that we can have a perfect posture.

But when we see a man’s shoulder line in standard suffering an immense tension, we don’t appreciate it. When in Latin-American dancing girls have such strong arms, we say that it’s not feminine. So what is the line between being not powerful enough and being too strong?  

To answer this question and understand what is best for our performance, we must get the audience’s perspective. A pleasant-to-watch couple must have a good body structure, powerful movement, and excellent body weight control.

Each one of these aspects requires a different kind of strength. The tone of the core muscles and ligaments will be responsible for your body posture. 

Then we need the muscles’ explosive power to make a good leg drive or stop a fast action, thus creating contrast. 

Thirdly, we must always control our body weight through continuous muscle work, which involves flexibility. That lets you have an exceptional ability to use eccentric, concentric, and isometric muscle work, creating that smooth body action that we all are searching for.

Bigger

“More is more.” 

We can agree with this statement in many circumstances, but is it the case for dancesport too?

If we see how they used to dance back in the ’60s, competitive dancing didn’t seek huge lines and big volumes. Today though, it seems impossible to compete with a small upper part or without a big drive action. 

But not all dances fit into the same box, each dance having its own character. One above all others is tango. Why should tango be big? Tango’s roots are not from a theater. On a stage. It wasn’t meant to impress people. Intimate, passionate, sad, angry, painful, elegant, but in a challenging way between man and woman, a search for each other against someone else’s will. 

So, can we maintain some of this character in our competitive performance? I don’t think we should say “can we” but “we must”. Top couples do that. That’s why we love to watch them. That’s why we can also appreciate their different styles. 

Of course, we can’t forget that to win a competition we have to show all the required aspects that judges are looking for, but we can’t completely go off track just seeking bigger movements.

Better

Nowadays the dancing level has drastically increased. A few decades ago, only top couples could perform well. Today, already from the younger categories, we can see great dancers from the ⅛. 

This is due to the mechanism that created good teachers that grew good students, generations to generations throughout the years. Today it’s not difficult to get information, to be able to practice, go to famous teachers. 

But the new generations have an essential duty on their shoulder: to improve dancing without losing the original character of each dance. 

Fashions change. We will see outstanding performances in the future for sure. But keep in mind that better doesn’t strictly mean more. Faster, stronger, and bigger than before should not be the guideline for the improvement. 

Unleash your talent without losing proportions, the character of the dance, musicality, and, most of all, your partner. 

The post Faster, Stronger, Bigger…Better? appeared first on Dancesport Life.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Copyright © 2018 Dancesport News. hello@dancesportnews.info